#FridayPainting: Frederick Carl Frieseke “Afternoon – Yellow Room”

I have already ordered my 2022 Art Calendar and am looking forward to unveiling it on January 1, 2022. It has become a tradition in our home for the past 10 years. Every day, I turn over the page to open a new painting that offers me a glimpse into the past. It is a source of daily enjoyment and exploration. There is always a story that surrounds an artwork, waiting to be discovered.

Today’s #FridayPainting “Afternoon – Yellow Room by Frederick Carl Frieseke is held at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in Newfields, IN, USA. The painting is described beautifully by the art gallery:

The colorful patterns and glowing sunshine here are signature elements of Frieseke’s work. He painted his wife in this same room under various light effects that he used to heighten the sparkle of the patterning around her.

Look closely at the painting and you will see a ghostly image above the hand on the woman’s lap. This is called a pentimento, meaning “repentance” in Italian. These occur when the paint becomes more transparent with age and reveals changes made by the artist. To find out what was hidden, an infrared reflectogram (IRR) image of the painting was taken (shown below). The IRR shows that the woman was originally holding an open book. The artist painted it out and shifted the position of the woman’s hand.”


Indianapolis Museum of Art

Who was Frederick Carl Frieseke? He is described as “The Decorative Impressionist” who focused on various effects of dappled sunlight. He is especially known for painting female subjects, both indoors and out.

Frederick Carl Frieseke was not the only one to paint in the Decorative Impressionism style. He was an influential member of the famous Giverny Colony of American Impressionists, who left the United States to live and paint near the home of Claude Monet.

They were called the “Giverny Group” – Richard Edward Miller, Guy Rose, Edmund Graecen, Lawton S. Parker and Karl Anderson. They were known to paint either high-key outdoor depictions of women in languid poses, or interior scenes with the figures illuminated by natural light from windows.

One painting has so many stories. And tomorrow, when the page turns, another story awaits.

18 Replies to “#FridayPainting: Frederick Carl Frieseke “Afternoon – Yellow Room””

  1. Love this!
    I adore all of the paintings you post here!
    Where do I order this calendar from?
    I’m off to gather a few supplies. I’ll see you on TT&T later today!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is the art calendar that I order every year. For the first few years, I found this calendar at Indigos, but recently I had to order it through Amazon.ca because I could no longer find it in a book store or on Indigos on-line: Art Page-A-Day Gallery Calendar 2022: A year of masterpieces on your desk. Calendar – Day to Day Calendar, (to be ready Oct. 12 2021) by Workman Calendars (Author)

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  2. Such a wonderful painting that brings a breath of fresh air, beauty and a smile of joy. An obvious Giverny member! 😉 Thank you for sharing it, my dear Rebecca! Many hugs!

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    1. Can you imagine what it would have been like to live close to Giverny, to be a neighbour and friend of Claude Monet? What fun it would be to watch him paint his precious water lilies. I can understand why Frederick Carl Frieseke thought it would be a good idea to move to Giverny!

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  3. This calendar is a source of joy every day for me. Thank you for your background to this painting and its artist ! Interesting how each artist has their own way of expressing colors and many different ways they find to change the colors over time–as in this painting. Paintings of women have increased over the years, a good change from the many years of men portrayed by many artists. (First time I have heard of the Giverny Colony! !)

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    1. I read that Frederick Carl Frieseke spent every summer from 1906 through 1919 in a residence next door to Monet’s. Can you imagine living next door to Claude Monet?!! I understand that the name “The Giverny Group” came into being December 1910, when Frieseke, Miller, Lawton S. Parker, Guy Rose, Edmund Greacen and Karl Anderson) were given a show at the Madison Gallery in New York. I have yet to explore the other 5 artists, but that will be another story….

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  4. I am so pleased to be looking forward to my next year’s calendar. I enjoy it every day. Thank you so very much for ordering it for me! ! !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So do I, Gallivanta. I imagined myself sitting in that lovely room on a summer day feeling the breeze come through the open doorway. Ahh……how refreshing.

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  5. I wasn’t able to get a calendar this year, so I have been very grateful to share yours each week, Becky, thank you! And thank you also for the reminder to get ordering for next year so I don’t miss out. xxx

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    1. I am delighted that you are ordering the calendar for next year, Liz. I ordered my copies (for Frances and me) earlier this year, but I don’t expect they will be mailed until October/November. When I first viewed this painting, I thought that the only thing that was missing was a book. Imagine my surprise when I read that there was a book in the original iteration of the painting that Frederick decided was not necessary. A few brushstroke and it was gone. YIKES! So I will always imagine that there is a book in the painting. I had never heard of the Giverny colony before. I continue to learn and learn and learn!

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