#FridayPainting 2022

Happy New Year!

Welcome to the first #FridayPainting of 2022, which unveils two magnificent paintings.

Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer

The 2022 Art Calendar welcomed me with “Girl with a Pearl Earring” by Johannes Vermeer. The work permanently resides in the Mauritshuis museum in The Hague.

The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli

The Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli. The work resides in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence.


The question I ask myself as we enter 2022 is one that has been in my mind over the years. It is simply – are we all artists? What is the measurement or benchmark to determine artist status?

How do we define art, talent, beauty, if we do not have some form of art within us? How do we appreciate profound messages that are embedded within art unless we have a creative spirit within us.

How can we compare ourselves to the greatness of Johannes Vermeer or Sandro Botticelli?

I have come to believe that the definition of “artist” covers a huge area, the essence being “a person who creates art.” Five simple words that do not include any measurement systems. An artist is an artist simply because he or she creates.

We are all artists!


Girl with a Pearl Earring, oil on canvas by Johannes Vermeer, c. 1665.
Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus (c. 1484–1486). Tempera on canvas.

22 Replies to “#FridayPainting 2022”

  1. Gorgeous picks today. Have you seen the movie of the Girl with the Earring? Scarlett Johanson played the girl, very intriguing. Hugs xx

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Hello Rebecca, I am quite sure you featured the painting of the girl with the pearl earrings last year as a post. I know I saw her and I don’t follow many blogs about paintings. You are wrong though [smile]. Not everyone is an artist. My husband is art deaf in the same way some people are tone deaf. Tee hee.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for opening my 2022 art calendar with me. It is always an exciting moment. The Girl with a Pearl Earring is everywhere these days, but this is the first time that I had a Johannes Vermeer painting. Isn’t she absolutely exquisite. This past week I am been viewing the work of Albrecht Dürer. His engraving Melencolia I included references to geometry, magic square, a truncated rhombohedron. And of course the golden ratio is seen in ancient art and architecture. I continue to learn and learn and learn!!! Thank you so much for being a most excellent companion! I love our conversations!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hi Rebecca, I enjoy our conversation too, and sometimes I find inspiration for a story in them which is simply marvelous. I wonder where I saw that painting then, oh well, I don’t suppose it matters but it is a beautiful one.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. I was surprised that I didn’t have any posts about Vermeer, especially since The Girl with the Pearl Earring is so famous. Hmmm….

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Oh Vermeer’s light is so beautiful. If you’ve never seen the fascinating 2013 documentary, “Tim’s Vermeer,” I highly recommend it! Different gifts and different strokes, competition and competence aside, the creative process often seems more important than what it produces. Because it’s during struggle and inspiration we get in touch with that intangible but objective truth of what art truly is. We respond subjectively and imperfectly, but we know creation when we see it. Hugs!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I FOUND it, Mary Jo! I am going to watch it tonight. Thank you so much for the introduction. I agree wholeheartedly that the creative process often seems more important than what it produces. We do indeed respond subjectively and imperfectly. “For now we see through a glass, darkly!”

      Liked by 2 people

  4. What a luxurious start to the New Year! (Happy New Year!!!!)
    LOVE The Girl With The Pearl Earring. Crazy… I know there is a movie, I have the book, which I never read. It was given to me by my father-in-law who was an artist. Now that I think about it, I believe he was trying to say something to me. The AGO has one of his paintings in their collection.
    “The Birth of Venus” is well known to me.
    I’m so excited to see what you bring us each Friday.
    Post on Rebecca!!!!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. My collection of Art Calendars goes back over 10 years ago. I have kept every one of them and have thought about going back and viewing the paintings again to see if I can identify artists. It has been my art class along with this blog. There are so many wonderful stories that are hidden by the folds of history that need to be discovered. I would love to join you at the AGO. Wouldn’t that be wonderful!!

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Rebecca, your love of fine art will enhance your inspiration for syllabic poetry. Use these paintings to fuel your words and emotions. It will be amazing. ❤ P. S. I love the art lessons. 😀

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I am so excited about where this year will lead, Colleen. Many thanks for your support and encouragement. About 10 years ago, I was on the 5th floor of the Musee d’Orsay with the Impressionists. I discovered that Renoir painted the last twenty years of his life even after his arthritis severely limited his mobility. Someone would place a paintbrush in his hand. He wrapped his hands with bandages to prevent skin irritation. I was humbled by Renoir’s determination to continue despite enormous physical challenges. This was the moment that I determined to look at art through a different lens – the artist’s story. ChasingART is my exploration and study of art. And NOW, I will be seeing art through the lens of poetry. We are on an incredible adventure of discovery.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. “I have come to believe that the definition of ‘artist’ covers a huge area, the essence being ‘a person who creates art'” — love that sentence and sentiment, Rebecca!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. When I was in grade 1 and 2, our class was divided into groups that indicated specific levels of reading ability. While I recognize that this system was created in good faith, it was soon clear that reading was a competition. My reading levels were above average (I had a head start at home), but my spelling skills were a disaster (and still are). I dreaded spelling bees where everyone had to demonstrate their spelling abilities. Again, competition was used as a motivator to define success and stratify individuals. The result being that we learned and are very capable of stratifying based on the many ubiquitous benchmarks set by society. So artists can only be artists based a set of criteria. I believe that competition is necessary and valuable for progress. And yet, as individuals, we need to rethink how to engage in a competitive world. Which means we need to revisit the definition of competition. Alas, I have digressed… Many thanks for your comments and visit, Dave. Very much appreciated.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. I am delighted and thrilled that we are continuing to explore our creative journeys. There are so many stories yet to be discovered. Many thanks for being a companion along the way. Hugs and more hugs!

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Two beautiful and very famous paintings. For obvious reasons I have a small preference for Vermeer and have seen this painting several times in The Hague. And it never fails to blow me away. There is going to be a Vermeer exhibition in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam this year and the girl will temporarily move to Amsterdam for this special occasion 😊😊😊

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Oh how wonderful to have seen The Girl with a Pearl Earring” in person. Will you be travelling to Amsterdam this year? I enjoy the Rijksmueum’s website and go there often. They always have a wonderful story, a video and details of paintings. Did you hear that a 717-gigapixel image of Rembrandt’s ‘The Night Watch’ is the largest to ever be published? Truly remarkable!!! https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en

      Liked by 1 person

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