#FridayPainting: John Melhuish Strudwick, “In the Golden Days”

How sad it were for Arthur, should he live,
To sit once more within the lonely hall,
And miss to hear high talk of noble deeds
As in the golden days before thy sin.’

TENNYSON, IDYLLS OF THE KING.
John Melhuish Strudwick in the Golden Days (John Melhuish Strudwick, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

John Melhuish Strudwick (1849-1937), an English Pre-Raphaelite painter, presents three beautiful female figures in a Medieval chamber at the bottom of a staircase. The painting is a blend of Renaissance and Medieval styles for which John Melhuish Strudwick was known.

I was captivated by the vibrant colours, the flow of the garments, and the intricate wood and gold paneling on the musical instrument.

The title is taken from Tennyson’s Idylls of the King from the part of the poem where Guinevere talks of her regret of her sins and desire to return to the idyllic time of her youth. The central figure dressed in green may therefore depict the young Guinevere, attended by two of her companions before she had met Arthur or Lancelot.” Sotheby’s

John Melhuish Strudwick in the Golden Days (John Melhuish Strudwick, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons)

Published by Rebecca Budd

Blogger, Visual Storyteller, Podcaster, Traveler and Life-long Learner

6 thoughts on “#FridayPainting: John Melhuish Strudwick, “In the Golden Days”

  1. Gorgeous! I too admire the draping of the dresses.
    Adore the richness of the painting.
    Thank you for sharing this. NOW, to figure out how you inspired Robbie to make a cake?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I knew that you would like this painting, Resa. In fact, I thought of you when I posted it. I just found a book called “The Fabric of Civilization by Virginia Postrel, which is all about textiles through the centuries. I have no idea when I will read it, but it looks very interesting. Will keep you posted.

      Liked by 1 person

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